Spirituality in Health Care

Spiritualityin Health Care

Spiritualityin Health Care

Whenplanning and building a hospital, most people focus on the cost ofthe project, the number of employees, location of every department,the number of beds it can hold, among other factors. However, somehospitals, such as Mercy Gilbert Medical Centre was so determined tonot only build a hospital, but also a healing hospital with a healingenvironment (Sadler and Guenther, 2015). Specifically, an environmentthat helps patients to feel comfortable and safe, as well remind itsstaff their role in the health industry. To come up with a healinghospital, these three key components should be put intoconsideration: a healing physical environment, an integration of workdesign and technology, as well as a culture of radical loving care.This paper discusses these three components of a healing hospital inrespect to spirituality, challenges of creating a healingenvironment, and the biblical aspects that support healing hospitalconcept.

AHealing Physical Environment

Ahealing environment does not only involve the patient, but also thepatient’s family members and friends. According to (Sadler, et.al., 2015), a true healing environment should help patients and theirfamilies to cope with illness stress. A healing environment should becool and quiet, that is, conducive for sleeping. Medics urge thatwhen a patient is asleep, cell regenerate faster hence, acceleratethe healing process. Therefore, a healing hospital opts to have somephysical characteristics that promote a quite environment. Forinstance, it should have a silencer on the cleaning machines,carpeted floors and hallways, and free from overhead paging, loudmachines, in-room intercoms, voices calling each other, and rollingdown hallways. A quite environment is also a secondary advantagebecause it also creates a stress-free environment to the caregivers.They are less distracted hence, there are minimal chances of makingmedical errors. Additionally, a quite environment does not only carefor the medical well-being of a patient, but also for the emotionaland spiritual well-being.

Integrationof Work Design and Technology

Ahealing hospital work closely with designers who designs it in a waysthat are more efficient both for the patients and staff members,enhances patients’ privacy and security, as well ensure technologypromote a healing environment. Technology in a hospital encompassesmany things ranging from elevators to medical machines. Zborowsky andKreitzer (2008) urge that patient should have privacy and security.This helps preserve the patients’ dignity throughout theirhospitalization. A healing hospital should have the latest machinesin their radiology and laboratory department. Technologicallyadvanced equipment offer the best healthcare services, as well asspeed up processes and results. Additionally, patients can takeadvantage of the latest technology in pulmonary testing, cardiology,and radiology. On the other hand, the physician can access testresults from the comfort of their offices hence, there is speed updecision-making and treatment.

ACulture of Radical Loving Care

Thisis the most critical component of a healing hospital. If a hospitalhas beautiful buildings, gardens, artwork, and advanced technology,but lacks compassionate care culture, then, that is a mere hospital,not a healing hospital. In other words, a healing hospital has astrong compassionate care culture based on radical loving careprinciples. Erie Chapman mastered the “radical loving care”philosophy and defined it as a chain of continuous caring lightaround every patient (Chapman and Chapman, 2004). This involvesjoining all caregivers together and creating a caring environmentthat focuses on every patient. It reminds caregivers their purpose inthe healthcare centers. Additionally, through a holistic approach,this philosophy caters for the patient physical, emotional, andspiritual needs. Furthermore, a healing hospital chooses its staffmembers based on their passion for helping others.

Challengesof a Healing Hospital

Unfortunately,creating a healing hospital is a challenge. Firstly, it is complex tobring all staff members, nurses, doctors, and physicians on board andfeed them with the philosophy of a healing environment. It isessential for healing hospital staff to support a healing hospitalphilosophy, as well as create a radical loving care culture (Chapman,et. al., 2004). However, this is easier said than done. Secondly, itis a challenge to create a quiet environment. Very few hospitals canafford to carpet their floors, install silencers on cleaningmachines, and avoid overhead paging. Thirdly, it is costly tointegrate work design and technology in hospitals. For instance,electronic medical record system is very efficient while accessingthe medical record of a patient. However, it is very expensive topurchase it.

BiblicalConcept of a Healing Hospital

Biblically,the concept of healing hospital is acceptable. There are Bible versesthat support the philosophy of healing. For example, Jeremiah 33: 6tells about health and healing. It states people should enjoy theabundance of peace and truth after they are healed. Correspondingly,healing hospitals support the biblical concept of healing. Accordingto Bible (2015), caregivers facilitate physical, emotion, andspiritual healing that give sense to peace and truth. Further, in theNew Testament, Jesus gave his disciple the power to cure diseases andto cast out demons. However, the Bible is against giving money forhealing purposes. Jesus asks his disciples to preach the gospel, healthe sick, but they should take nothing in return.

Conclusion

Fora healing hospital to be successful, it should institute the threecomponents of the healing environment. Besides, it should come upwith strategies to overcome barriers and challenges that accompany ahealing hospital. In essence, all hospitals should consider becominghealing hospitals, as well as provide their patients withcompassionate care and increase staff satisfaction.

References

Bible,B. (2015).&nbspTheHoly Bible The Authorized King James Version.Century Publishing.

Chapman,E., &amp Chapman, E. (2004).&nbspRadicalloving care: Building the healing hospital in America.Nashville, Tenn: Baptist Healing Hospital Trust.

Sadler,B. L., &amp Guenther, R. (2015). Ten rules for 21st centuryhealthcare: a US perspective on creating healthy, healingenvironments.&nbspFutureHospital Journal,&nbsp2(1),22-27.

Zborowsky,T., &amp Kreitzer, M. J. (2008). Creating optimal healingenvironments in a health care setting.&nbspMinnesotamedicine,&nbsp91(3),35-38.

SPIRITUALITY IN HEALTH CARE 0

Components That Make up a World View

Aerts et al (2007) present seven components that make up a worldviewin seven questions that when answered, an individual would developtheir world view.

1. A model of the world

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Whatis the nature of our world? How is it structured and how does itfunction?

2. Explanation

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Whyis our world the way it is, and not different? Why are we the way weare, and not different? What kind of global explanatory principlescan we put forward?” (pp. 13).

3. Futurology

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the question, “Why dowe feel the way we feel in this world, and how do we assess globalreality, and the role of our species in it?” (pp. 13).

4. Values

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Howare we to act and to create in this world? How, in what differentways, can we influence the world and transform it? What are thegeneral principles by which we should organise our actions?”(pp. 13).

5. Action

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Whatfuture is open to us and our species in this world? By what criteriaare we to select these possible futures?” (pp. 13).

6. Knowledge

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the question, “Howare we to construct our image of this world in such a way that we cancome up with answers to (1), (2), and (3)?” (pp. 13).

7. Building Blocks

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the question, “Whatare some of the partial answers that we can propose to thesequestions?” (pp. 13).

Classmate 1

The world is currently experiencing alterations and acceleration inhuman behavior and mental processes. Both the individual mind and thecollective culture are facing a huge challenge coping with theseunpredictable changes and increasing complexities in human health. Asstress, frustrations, and uncertainties increase within a health caresetting, nurses will find their minds overloaded with information andoveremphasizing knowledge fragments, negative developments, anderosion of values while ignoring the positive things. Consequently,this form of thinking towards stress, frustrations and uncertaintiesestablish a climate of nihilism and anxiety alongside despair. Otherprofessionals in a similar situation would think otherwise dependingon their background and personality. It is, therefore, important toestablish a framework that incorporates everything to facilitate anunderstanding of the world and make critical decisions to shape thefuture of the nursing profession.

Classmate 2

Beyond what we see as socio-cultural institutions and observablehuman behavior lies core worldview assumptions and shared values.Generally, a worldview how one sees and interprets current lifeevents such as lack of nurses motivation. Worldviews, just like anycore foundations, for example that o a building, are hidden from thesight. Like seeing through a glass, they exist but we are barelyaware they do or we basically assume them. In a health care setting,a nurse`s views of their career will depend on how they can relate totheir patients and colleagues and how their environment (patients,colleagues, and organizational culture) will relate to them.

Classmate 3

There is no doubt that each person or group has a worldview which isbasically what they think is actually real. Worldviews are learnedand the decisions individuals or groups make from what they learnwill be either conscious or subconscious. Considering thatindividuals and groups are unique, their concepts about what isactually real will, therefore, differ, and so are their decisions aswell. Apparently, there is no set rule or group that works for allnurses but based on their religion, culture, beliefs, and lifeexperiences, they are able to make critical health care decisions fora positive patient outcome (Aerts, et al 2007). Their decisions areprincipally driven by knowledge, ethics, anthropology, and theology.For example, whether a Christian, a Buddhist, a Muslim, or a Pagannurse, the right medication will be administered to the patient.

Classmate 4

Taking a closer look at different worldviews, there are five keythings that are evident which make up the big picture. The first isGod, in which people seek to identify whether they are accountable toany personal, transcendent Supreme Being and what He looks like. Thesecond is creation, in which people attempt to find whether they camefrom and what sustains them. The third is humanity, in which peoplestrive to find who they are and their uniqueness. The fourth is moralorder, where people strive to find out who makes rules and whetherthe rules apply to everyone. The final is &quotpurpose&quot, inwhich people endeavor to find out why they exist. For Christians, theBible provides these and many other answers (Aerts, et al., 2007).

References

Aerts, D., et al. (2007). World Views: From Fragmentation toIntegration. Clément Vidal and

Alexander Riegler.

Components That Make up a World View

Aerts et al (2007) present seven components that make up a worldviewin seven questions that when answered, an individual would developtheir world view.

1. A model of the world

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Whatis the nature of our world? How is it structured and how does itfunction?

2. Explanation

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Whyis our world the way it is, and not different? Why are we the way weare, and not different? What kind of global explanatory principlescan we put forward?” (pp. 13).

3. Futurology

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the question, “Why dowe feel the way we feel in this world, and how do we assess globalreality, and the role of our species in it?” (pp. 13).

4. Values

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Howare we to act and to create in this world? How, in what differentways, can we influence the world and transform it? What are thegeneral principles by which we should organise our actions?”(pp. 13).

5. Action

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the questions, “Whatfuture is open to us and our species in this world? By what criteriaare we to select these possible futures?” (pp. 13).

6. Knowledge

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the question, “Howare we to construct our image of this world in such a way that we cancome up with answers to (1), (2), and (3)?” (pp. 13).

7. Building Blocks

In this component, Aerts et al (2007) ask the question, “Whatare some of the partial answers that we can propose to thesequestions?” (pp. 13).

Classmate 1

A worldview is a term used todescribe how an individual (s) views the world around them.“Worldviews provide the cultural lenses that help shape how we seethe world, and they give meaning do to life, both personally and forhumanity as a whole.” (Shelly &amp Miller, 2006). This view mayvary among individuals. There are many factors that can influence anindividual whether it comes from their culture, beliefs, values, andreligion or life experiences.&nbspAuthorJames Sire states that in order to understand the concept ofworldviews, an individual needs to answer the following questions.

What is prime reality?

The prime reality is the Law ofAttraction or the universal energy that rewards virtue and punishesvice.What isthe nature of the world around us?

It listens to our wishes and actsaccordingly.Whatis a human being?

A human being is an entity thatcontrols the world.Whathappens to a person at death?

A person is forgotten and whathappens to him/her is unknown.

Why is it possible to knownothing at all?

Because life is incomplete initself and the present holds no clue about the future.

How do we know what is right orwrong?

By experience with the past of events.Whatis the meaning of human history?

That human beings have an originand are headed to an unknown direction.

Answeringthese questions will help one to develop their worldviews. Peoplewill have different backgrounds and thus differing views, rangingfrom Christian to non-Christian. Answering these components shouldhelp in figuring out which category one will fit in to. For example,for the first question, a Christian might say, God is reality,whereas a non-Christian might have an answer stating that a SupremeBeing is reality(Shelly &amp Miller, 2006).

Classmate 2 Aperson’s worldview is essentially the way one views the worldaround us. Our individual worldview is influenced by our privatepractices, core beliefs, and personal&nbsprelationships(GCU, 2015). Worldviews could easily be considered a person’sidentity due to the fact that they are deeply seated within anindividual’s personality, religion, and cultural belief system(Wiher, 2014). Worldviews can be shared by whole groups such asreligious sects and those of the same cultural background, they mayjust as easily be very personal and individualized (Shelly &ampMiller, 2006). An individual’s worldview essentially toucheseverything in their life and can be descriptively referred to as theglasses through which we view the world (GCU, 2015). It is possiblefor a person to have their personal worldview as well as theircommunal view without all points/beliefs agreeing. It is important tobe knowledgeable regarding our own worldviews in order to understandthe views of others.&nbsp

Classmate 3 Aworldview is a term used to describe how an individual(s) views theworld around them. “Worldviews provide the cultural lenses thathelp shape how we see the world, and they give meaning do to life,both personally and for humanity as a whole.” (Shelly &amp Miller,2006, p. 35) This view may vary among individuals. There are manyfactors that can influence an individual whether it comes from theirculture, beliefs, values, and religion or life experiences.&nbspAuthorJames Sire states that in order to understand the concept ofworldviews, an individual needs to answer the followingquestions.What isprime reality?

The prime reality is God.Whatis the nature of the world around us?

The world is complete in itself andvibrant.What is ahuman being?

A human being is the primeintelligence of God’s creation that takes care of otherbeings.What happensto a person at death?

One goes to another world in adifferent body.Whyis it possible to know nothing at all?

Because God has all the answers toHis creation.How dowe know what is right or wrong?

By using what is established byothers as conventionalWhatis the meaning of human history?

The past and evolution of man upto his current form. An individual does not need to be religious in order to have aworldview. Some individuals may have a difficult time answering thesequestions or others may think certain individual’s answers to beabsurd. Worldview is an individual perception of how they view theworld through their eyes (Shelly &amp Miller, 2006).

Classmate 4 Scrutinizing how weanswer seven questions regarding life develops the Personal WorldviewInventory. Everyone has a philosophy on life though his or herethics, culture, knowledge, and personal experiences. In PrimeReality, one searches for God. Does the creator exist and what is Godlike? With these questions, ultimately, we probe into the human souland search to receive answers to what happens to our spirit at death.Human curiosity questions how humans became to existence, ourintelligence, our history, and our nature towards our immediatefamily vs. the global family. Humans pursuit and acquire moralstandings of right and wrong from religion, family, andsociety.Everyone hasan answer. Who is right? A person’s Prime Reality will dictate howthey conduct themselves through life. How they make decision andtheir treatment to others.

References

Aerts, D., et al. (2007). World Views: From Fragmentation toIntegration. Clément Vidal and

Alexander Riegler.

Shelly, J., &ampMiller, A. (2006). Called to care: A Christian worldview for nursing(2nd ed.) Downers Grove, Ill.: IVP Academic/Inter Varsity Press.

Grand CanyonUniversity (2015). Foundations of Christian spirituality in healthcare [Lecture notes]. Retrieved fromhttps://lc-ugrad1.gcu.edu/learningPlatform/user/users.html?operation=home&ampclassId=8265d1dc-ddef-47ff-bdfd-a28c8c005e9a#/learningPlatform/loudBooks/loudbooks.html?viewPage=current&ampoperation=innerPage¤tTopicname=Foundationsof Spirituality inHealthCare&amptopicMaterialId=21e0d7ae-f8d6-49e0-b839-45cdfea6fcc2&ampcontentId=656e4f2e-c8d8-4ae8-acf2-4abcd8f971d0&amp

Wiher, H.(2014, October). Worldview and identity across conversion.Evangelical review of theology, 38, 304-323. Retrieved fromhttp://eds.a.ebscohost.com.library.gcu.edu:2048/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=f1f3df9a-5e05-4146-bf73-f4651417c517%40sessionmgr4005&ampvid=3&amphid=4111

Sir, J.(2015). 8 Questions Every Worldview Must Answer. Retrieved fromhttp://www.christianity.com/theology/other-religions-beliefs/8-questions-every-worldview-must-answer.html?p=0